The Allure of Unusual Venice.

Unusual Venice

Wings outside a cathedral. Nothing unusual about that. Not for Venice, anyway.

Her streets may be thronged with tourists, but the city is alive with those who live and work here – simply rise at dawn and wander through the fish markets behind the Rialto, or have a quiet coffee with the locals in a backstreet cafe before they head off to work and you realise how many people live in this place of no cars.

Continue Reading →

On Discovering a Painting by Vasari

On Discovering a Painting by Vasari

 

I know of Vasari largely through his Lives of the Artists (considered the first work on art history). I read this once in Florence, and it brought to life the works adorning the city around me. Born in 1511, Giorgio Vasari lived in Florence through the High Renaissance, and was befriended by Michelangelo; he knew many of the men whose biographies (and gossip) he recorded in his seminal work.

Vasari was also an architect – hence the eponymous Vasari Corridor in Florence. He designed the Loggia for the Palazzo degli Uffizi, as well as the corridor connecting Uffizi to The Pitti Palace across the Arno.

Yet I did not expect to stumble across one of his paintings in the port of Livorno.

Continue Reading →

My Walk In A Medieval Sky

The Rooftop of the Duomo, Milan

 

Walking on the Rooftop of the Duomo, Milan

 

It took a while for Milan to grow on me. The city lacks the obvious historical romance of a Paris, or the vibrancy of a Barcelona. Her charms and delights lie hidden, separated by a sprawling metropolis. Milan is not walkable like Florence, and she lacks the quaintness of a small town such as Assisi.

It’s easy to find the heart of a small town, where locals live and promenade of an evening, and the cafés and restaurants are full of locals and tourists alike. In contrast, the first face Milan presents to the visitor is of a large, rambling city, filled with dirt and pollution, and buildings which have seen better days. Yet scattered through this lie pockets of wonders, such as the Duomo, the area around Sforza Castle, her art galleries – and, of course, Leonardo’s Last Supper.

Continue Reading →

Nasoni – Rome’s Fountains of the Big Noses

Convent Stays

The history of Rome can be seen in her nasoni, or fountains of the big noses. From the aqueducts supplying an ancient city, to the beauty of her Renaissance fountains, Rome has always been dependant upon a fresh water supply. In 98 AD the Roman Consul was named as Guardian of the city’s water supply; today the Romans have l’acqua del sindaco – the mayor’s water. Free to residents and tourists alike, clean water sprouts from drinking fountains, called nasoni, all over the city.

 

Continue Reading →

Convent Stays – A Unique Type of Accommodation

Convent Stays

A heavy wooden door separated the convent from the outside world. As it closed behind me, I stood surrounded by silence. Flying anywhere from Australia takes a long time, and after a night and a day and a night I was exhausted. In true Roman style the taxi driver had careened down tiny streets where footpaths were more a suggestion than reality, before double-parking on the wrong side of the road.

The convent Le Soure di Lourdes was just a short walk from the top of the Spanish Steps. Once inside, the world became peaceful. Large wooden doors shut out the chaos of the street, and I stood in the quiet of a marble foyer.

Continue Reading →