Dawn in Hoi An

 

It is autumn, and dawn comes late, and the darkness early, in Hoi An. Autumn by the calender, but not by feel, for it is easily 30C each day, the humidity reaching the 90s.

In the darkness of the pre-dawn, the air felt cool. Once on the water, a sea breeze played around us as we set out over the waves. Around us, were struggling with their nets in the darkness, somehow balancing in their tiny boats. Larger boats circled around them, buying the fresh catch from the fishermen and delivering it to the markets, or straight to the restaurants of Hoi An.
Continue Reading →

Lost on the Mekong Delta

 

Heart of Darkness

 

The river washed away the humidity of the wet-season. A soft breeze drifted over the waters of the Mekong Delta, granting some relief from the heat. Our little wooden boat putted further and further upstream as a wall of green closed around us. Civilisation seemed far away.

Only that morning I’d been wandering the chaos of Saigon. Before dawn the bikes start their chorus of horns. Even at that hour the streets are busy, and the place simply bursts with energy. It is a city totally alive – and totally exhausting with its humidity.

Continue Reading →

Saigon: In The Footsteps Of Graham Greene

 

Saigon

 

Having spent a few years living in Saigon, Graham Greene’s The Quiet American is in many ways his homage to this vibrant city.

Despite a somber tone coloured by the knowledge of what is to come, Greene’s love of Saigon and her people shines throughout the novel. Continue Reading →

The Quiet American – Graeme Greene

Under the skilful hand of Graeme Greene, the tone of The Quiet American changes with

Graham Greene
An old map of Saigon

each reading. The soft voice of Fowler contrasts with the violence of the world around him.

After dinner I sat and waited for Pyle in my room over the Catinat

So opens the novel. Not until the novel’s ending do we realise Fowler knows Pyle to be dead, although he pretends to himself Pyle may have escaped the doom Fowler himself helped arrange, if only by proxy. What exactly drives Fowler to this – for he knows what will come of Pyle should Fowler simply stand by a window, reading. Although he pretends otherwise, Fowler himself does not really understand his motives. Despair in the false foundations of Pyle’s good intentions; the hypocrisy which sees innocents die to impress the politicians of home good cause; jealously; fear of being alone; justice – all these play a role, yet even Fowler never knows the predominant emotion. What angers him most is Pyle’s blindness to the hypocrisy and faults of his beliefs, yet anger is an emotion the repressed Fowler can not express. Continue Reading →